Bring Your Own Device

Bring Your Own Device: Q&A With Global Executive Advisory Council Member Bill Oliver

The pandemic has changed the working landscape, relocating employees from confined office spaces to their homes.  Leaders may think that as long as employees have access to the internet, they can work from home (WFH). And that may be so, technically. Beyond the technicalities, however—and beyond the very real concerns behind preserving the employee experience—WFH is a logistical nightmare that exacerbates concerns over security and compliance. At the conventional office, organizations spend a significant amount of time and budget to ensure that their infrastructure is secure and as regulatory compliant as possible; the office is, effectively, a highly controlled environment. The moment you send any employee to WFH, you introduce many variables that could have hidden consequences. Questions arise: How secure is the home network? How secure is a personal device? How do you keep corporate data secure on a personal device? How much control does a corporation have over a home network or personal device? The list goes on. Covering some of these very issues is the following Q&A between Brent Skinner, director and principal analyst for 3Sixty Insights’ HCM practice, and Bill Oliver, a member of the 3Sixty Insights Global Executive Advisory Council and founder of Oliver Advisory […]

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3Sixty Insights – #HRTechChat with Michael Haske of Paylocity

Welcome to 3Sixty Insights’ latest #HRTechChat. Last week, Michael Haske, president and chief operating officer of Paylocity, joined us for a wide-ranging conversation. Following is a taste of the ideas we discussed:. How you could replace the “versus” in concrete versus abstract HCM with “and”—and how this parlays nicely with what Paylocity refers to as “tactical” and “strategic” HCM How tactical/concrete and strategic/abstract HCM are both incredibly important to organizational success How most aspects of HCM are, in fact, both tactical/concrete and strategic/abstract simultaneously—think of a Venn Diagram with most of the two circles overlapping How C-suites are really beginning to come around and take strategic (and abstract) HCM seriously How Michael sees the shift as not only situational (e.g., the pandemic), but also generational: younger people are basically wrestling our notions of the value and meaning of business to society into a more progressive place, but without necessarily dispensing with the traditional How more people are getting into HR for the value it can bring to the table, beyond being a cost center—and how this caliber of HR person brings a level of sophistication to the organization and can become a leader’s trusted advisor in ways we just didn’t […]

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Artificial Intelligence, Annual Performance Reviews, and the Future of Work’s Past

The future of work has potentialities far and wide. Delve into any one aspect of it, and you quickly find yourself deep down a fascinating rabbit hole contemplating what seems like a nearly incomprehensible theory of everything. Because of this, it appears inadvisable to try to present a unified meta-theory encapsulating everything about the future of work in a single blog entry. Wisely, this blog entry attempts no such thing. What you’re reading, rather, is the first of many interrelated meditations on the future of work. Each will prompt the next. Death to the Annual Review The following headline appeared at Human Resource Executive late last month: “Are annual reviews a thing of the past?” And look at this five-year-old article at SHRM. The speculation has festered for even longer, and the theme has become de rigueur for a reason. We’re heading away, yes — far away — from annual performance reviews and many other mainstays related to the assessment of people in most exempt job settings. But we’ll never get all the way there till today’s concept of having a job becomes a thing of the past, too. That’s a ways away. But it’s coming nevertheless in the form […]

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Case Study | isolved Partners with a Nonprofit Client to Deepen and Broaden HCM System Utilization

Employers often underutilize their existing technologies for human capital management (HCM). Whether it be in payroll, time and attendance, scheduling, benefits administration, talent management, talent acquisition or employee training and development, the underutilization can be relegated to a narrow domain of the solution’s scope. Alternately, the underutilization can be widespread, systemic. Some users are unaware of their underutilization. Still others may notice subpar results from the system in place and misplace blame for the situation. The root causes for these misunderstandings or miscommunications are many. For example, employees who led implementation may leave and take the knowledge of how a system works with them. Conversely, a solution integrator may do a poor job in training system-facing staff on how to get the most out of the  software. There are other possibilities. 3Sixty Insights wrote this report with the intent of helping organizations see how an employer significantly underutilizing its existing HCM technology came to recognize this, deploy the untapped functionality, and realize value for the business. Here, the vendor providing that value is isolved. The breadth and depth of capabilities found in isolved’s solution pleasantly surprised the customer featured. So did the vendor’s willingness to work with this user in […]

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iCIMS Understands: Talent Acquisition Is Now Inside and Outside

The linear, one-to-many and many-to-one journey of the job seeker is fast becoming a quaint relic of the past. So is its counterpart, the conventional approach to talent acquisition for hiring organizations — also at once one-to-many and many-to-one. This extinction is good, not bad. It would be great if this extinction picked up the pace. Many remain trapped in the old binary, a ledger of job seekers on one side and hiring organizations on the other as both apply an anachronistic model to their search. Their collective lives can be frustrating. In bad economies, the odds of this model working in favor of job seekers are exceedingly low as an influx of applications flood the hiring organization’s zone. In bad and good economies alike, the odds that the right hire will surface through conventional channels are exceedingly low for all but the lowest-skill jobs — and hiring organizations pine for tools that deliver on the hype: that recruiters can cut through the chaff and find that so-called diamond-in-the-rough of a candidate, the silver bullet to solve the problem for which the open role exists. Why is this? For one, the underlying condition hobbling these stakeholders is extant: a collection […]

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Salesforce Further Infiltrates HCM with Acquisition of Slack

Enter a highly infectious virus. To slow its spread, institute widespread lock-down orders. In tandem, order office employees to work from home and staff usually in the field to embrace unfamiliar, hybrid onsite-offsite schedules. Mix in a healthy dose of confusion to accompany this massive disruption to the heretofore expected way of doing things. Before 2020, collaboration tech was already the functionality all the cool companies had. It has suddenly become the must-have for just about any company as we approach 2021. Most nooks and crannies of the business could use effective applications for collaboration right now. Employees, customers, partners, prospects and other stakeholders need efficient, effective means, stat, to communicate, cooperate and coordinate. But end-to-end systems for the entire enterprise or silos of it are a pesky challenge when it comes to adding new functionality to them. So are long-in-the-tooth tech stacks. The more technically inclined might disagree here or, conversely, identify additional root causes impeding vendors’ agility in expanding their products’ capabilities organically — in this case, into collaboration functionality. Suffice it to say, however, that the sophisticated technology needed for the level of collaboration businesses now need isn’t exactly easy to develop. Easier is for vendors to […]

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Research Preview | Concrete vs. Abstract HCM: A New Way for Organizations to Look at HCM

There are two hemispheres to human capital management (HCM). Much as the left brain is logical and mathematical and the right one emotional and creative, one hemisphere of HCM is concrete, whereas the other is abstract. To be successful, you need both. In the concrete hemisphere are all the elements of HCM that make HR a cost center and most of today’s financially quantifiable value. In the abstract hemisphere is everything that inspires most to enter the HCM profession in the first place. Though some are more apparently the playground of one hemisphere or the other, in their expression, most domains of HCM have abstract and concrete elements to them. Organizations must recognize and acknowledge that there is much intrinsic value to approaching HCM abstractly. The return on a dedication to doing so is survival. Research Overview 3Sixty Insights recently published a research note on the areas of inquiry the HCM practice plans to pursue in the coming months. The first and current research initiative for the HCM practice at 3Sixty Insights is an investigation of the concrete and abstract elements and aspects of HCM. Through interviews with end-users of HCM technology and vendors of it, 3Sixty Insights’ goal is […]

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