Nate Smith - Lever

3Sixty Insights #HRTechChat with Nate Smith, Founder and CEO of Lever

Nate Smith, founder and CEO of San Francisco–based Lever, joined us for this episode of the 3Sixty Insights #HRTechChat. Lever’s technology for talent acquisition, as well as the vendor’s philosophy behind finding new hires, helps employers facing complex challenges in reaching their strategic goals identify and woo future employees whose skills are essential to the related tasks at hand. As you can imagine, this made for an interesting podcast. Nate and I first spoke last summer and openly wondered whether it might have been one year exactly to the day that we recorded this episode — which was Monday, July 19. Being a calendar pack rat, I did a search, and it turns out that we were off by just one week. Imagine that. Many […]

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3Sixty Insights #HRTechChat with Theresa Harkins-Schulz, Senior Vice President of Customer Experience at Inspirus

For our latest episode of #HRTechChat, my guest was Theresa Harkins-Schulz, senior vice president of customer experience at Inspirus. And this is where our conversation began, with Theresa’s sharing of her philosophy around the customer journey. Because of its customer-centered connotations, she prefers the term customer experience over customer success and other monikers denoting the realm of activities organizations carry out in tending to their customers. From there, our discussion expanded to ponder comparisons between the customer experience and the employee experience and to what extent organizations can approach both similarly, look at them through the same lens, or even coordinate their efforts. A member of the 3Sixty Insights Global Executive Advisory Council and long-time board member (and past president and past education chair) for […]

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Blockchain, AI, Resumes, Managers, Gig Economies, and the Future of Work

This blog recently covered performance reviews and the future of work. Specifically, we explored why annual performance reviews will — eventually — become a thing of the future’s past. Part-and-parcel of this is the inexorable march toward workforce agility, which will spur — also eventually — self-forming teams, an attendant demise of the role of manager and extinction of job titles. Where do the conventional instruments we’ve known for evaluating employees sit in this vision of the future of work? We might not even call them employees or workers anymore. I’ve heard the term “contributors” bandied about and like it. Through advanced artificial intelligence, this will look nothing like the contentious relationships between so-called gig workers and the likes of Uber et al. Regardless, we […]

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Artificial Intelligence, Annual Performance Reviews, and the Future of Work’s Past

The future of work has potentialities far and wide. Delve into any one aspect of it, and you quickly find yourself deep down a fascinating rabbit hole contemplating what seems like a nearly incomprehensible theory of everything. Because of this, it appears inadvisable to try to present a unified meta-theory encapsulating everything about the future of work in a single blog entry. Wisely, this blog entry attempts no such thing. What you’re reading, rather, is the first of many interrelated meditations on the future of work. Each will prompt the next. Death to the Annual Review The following headline appeared at Human Resource Executive late last month: “Are annual reviews a thing of the past?” And look at this five-year-old article at SHRM. The speculation […]

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iCIMS Understands: Talent Acquisition Is Now Inside and Outside

The linear, one-to-many and many-to-one journey of the job seeker is fast becoming a quaint relic of the past. So is its counterpart, the conventional approach to talent acquisition for hiring organizations — also at once one-to-many and many-to-one. This extinction is good, not bad. It would be great if this extinction picked up the pace. Many remain trapped in the old binary, a ledger of job seekers on one side and hiring organizations on the other as both apply an anachronistic model to their search. Their collective lives can be frustrating. In bad economies, the odds of this model working in favor of job seekers are exceedingly low as an influx of applications flood the hiring organization’s zone. In bad and good economies alike, […]

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